Q: When Is a Small Critter Too Large? (Re-post)

A: When you can’t get the entire critter in the frame! While visiting the local prairie meadow in June, I saw this adorable Mayfly. With such delicate structure, I wanted to get the entire specimen in the frame, especially to show off his extremely large tail, but I also wanted to be able to capture all of his unique details. But this was the extent of being able to capture a “macro” of this wonderful insect, while keeping him entirely within the frame:

Mayfly

 

Without much choice, in order to get a larger, more detailed image of the little guy, I would need to photograph only a portion of him, so I started photographing him, moving in a bit with each subsequent shot:

Mayfly

 

This next image is my favorite. I just love getting down to the level where you can see all the tiny details that you normally don’t see with the naked eye! So, although I can’t show the entire length of this creature with this image (the Mayfly was quite long!), the unique details shown at this level is what I enjoy photographing:

Mayfly

 

If I would have had the time, and the wind had not been blowing, I would have loved to take multiple up-close images (true macros) and try stitching them together to make a large, macro image. I love playing with things like that. But the conditions on this day were not conducive to this type of experimentation. But given the right chance, I certainly will try. (By the way, this guy was a bit “late” … this was taken in June!)

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Posted in 2012, Blog, Macro Photography, Nature Photography
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