2015 Faves, Part 3

In Part 3 of my 2015 Favorite images/trips, I’m highlighting a small portion of the many beautiful spring woodland wildflowers that I photographed this past spring. Woodland wildflowers begin emerging in early spring, typically March-April, and their timing is wonderful for curing my “cabin fever” that has built up over the winter! Here are some of the wonderful, spring woodland wildflowers that adorned my viewfinder:

 

False Garlic wildflowerFalse Garlic

 

False Rue Anemone wildflowerFalse Rue Anemone

 

False Rue Anemone wildflowerFalse Rue Anemone

 

Bluebell wildflower budsBluebells, starting to unfurl

 

Bluebell wildflowersBluebells in bloom, with pink buds in the background

 

Trout Lily (Dog-tooth Violet)Dog-tooth Violet (aka, Trout Lily)

 

Trout Lily (Dog-tooth Violet)Dog-tooth Violet (aka, Trout Lily)

 

Common Violet wildflowerCommon Violet

 

Yellow Violet wildflowerYellow Violet

 

Striped Cream Violet wildflowerStriped Cream Violet

 

Striped Cream Violet wildflowerStriped Cream Violet

 

Bloodroot wildflowerBloodroot

 

Spring Beauty wildflowersSpring Beauty

 

Blue Phlox wildflowerBlue Phlox

 

Blue-eyed Mary wildflowerBlue-eyed Mary

 

Flowering DogwoodFlowering Dogwood

 

Not only do I look forward to photographing Missouri’s spring woodland wildflowers again in a few months, but also for conducting more 1/2 day workshops, teaching others how to capture our beautiful wildflowers.

 

 

 

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Posted in 2015, Blog, focus stacking, Macro Photography, Nature Photography, Photography Workshop, Wildflowers
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  • Beautiful! Sometimes I miss photographing flowers.

  • Thanks, Scott! Interestingly, I wasn’t interested in flowers that much until one of my digital SLR class students asked me to teach a macro class. I quickly began photographing flowers and insects, to get up to speed with macro. That hooked me and I now enjoy photographing wildflowers about as much as wildlife!

    Have a happy and prosperous New Year! :o)