Black-crowned Night Herons

When I recently traveled to Florida, one of my target birds for the trip was the Black-crowned Night Heron (BCNH). These herons are smaller herons and can be quite shy to photograph. But, like many birds in Florida, they are accustomed to humans and can be much easier to photograph. They seem to be more active at dawn and dusk, which was fine with me and the lighting is typically much better then, than during mid-day.

I was hoping to find some of these herons at the Venice Rookery, and I wasn’t disappointed! Several BCNH’s were busy flying from and to the rookery as they were int he process of building nests. Here are a few of my favorite images of this colorful little heron:

Black-Crowned Night Heron

Black-Crowned Night Heron

Black-Crowned Night Heron

Black-Crowned Night Heron

I was even able to capture a “in your face” image as this little guy flew out, straight at me:

Black-Crowned Night Heron

In my next post, I’ll share some Black-crowned Night Heron images as they bring nesting materials back to the rookery.

Photographic Equipment Used:

  • Canon 5D Mark III body and 7D Mark II body
  • Canon 500mm, f/4 IS lens (+ 1.4x TC with some images)
  • Bogen 3221 tripod with Wimberly gimbal head
  • ISO 250 to ISO 400
  • Aperture f/4 to f/13
  • Shutter 1/1600 sec. to 1/5000 sec.

 

 

If you enjoyed this post, please share this link with others who you feel may enjoy it!

Posted in 2018, Bird Photography, Birds, Blog, Nature Photography, Travel Photography
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , .
Permalink bookmark.
Follow comments: RSS feed for this post.
Trackbacks are closed, but you can post a comment.
  • Alma

    Hi Jim – when you say that they are a “smaller heron”, can you give us a better idea about how long they might typically be from tip of the beak to end of the tail feathers? would it be fair to say that they look like they are 10-14″ in length based upon your photos?

  • Hi, Alma! That’s probably pretty close … may be a bit longer from beak to tail. They mostly look “small” because they lack the long legs and long neck, as the Great Blue Heron exhibits. If you are familiar with the Green Heron, they’re pretty similar in size to the Black-crowned Night Heron. :o)