How to Transplant a Gosling

Today’s post is a followup to the previous post (“Growing Goslings” , in case you missed it).

“Transplanting” is the process of moving from one location to another. How do the goslings relocate? Well, I was blessed with the opportunity to see how the little ones moved from the dock flower pot to the dock floor.

Here are the little ones, all fumbling about, each one wanting to leave the pot and join up with it’s parents (off to the left, out of this image), but afraid to be the first “jumper”:

Canada Goose goslings ready to leave the nest

As I was watching this comical sight, the first one leaped from the pot … I missed the shot, but here’s the first one on dry land:

Canada Goose goslings ready to leave the nest

Canada Goose goslings ready to leave the nest

This action then created a mass exodus with the remaining goslings:

Canada Goose goslings ready to leave the nest

Oops, didn’t stick the landing!

Canada Goose goslings ready to leave the nest

Then the next one prepares to take the leap of faith:

Canada Goose goslings ready to leave the nest

Looks like a swan dive:

Canada Goose goslings ready to leave the nest

But turns into a belly flop:

Canada Goose goslings ready to leave the nest

Meanwhile, here comes the next one:

Canada Goose goslings ready to leave the nest

Canada Goose goslings ready to leave the nest

Canada Goose goslings ready to leave the nest

And he sticks the landing!  Even sticks his little wings out to balance the landing. Then, the next one prepares himself:

Canada Goose goslings ready to leave the nest

Canada Goose goslings ready to leave the nest

Canada Goose goslings ready to leave the nest

Canada Goose goslings ready to leave the nest

What do you call that … a mid-air, 90-degree landing?

As the group of six goslings congregate on the dock, it’s time to explore … the one on the right is racing towards Mom:

Canada Goose goslings ready to leave the nest

Finally, all six are together in a group. Note the one on the far left … the one behind the railing. My next post follows this little family around, and the one on the left makes a big, OOPS!

Canada Goose goslings ready to leave the nest

By the way, a seventh gosling was still in the nesting pot. Unfortunately, he was the runt of the litter and did not survive.

The next post … “Gosling Olympics”.

 

Photographic Equipment Used:

  • Canon 5D Mark 3 bodies (2 used)
  • Canon 100-400mm, f/4.5-f/5.6 IS IS lens, and Canon 500mm, f/4 IS lens
  • Handheld, with IS “On” (100-400mm lens) and Bogen 3021 tripod with Wemberly gimbal tripod head (500 mm lens)
  • ISO 200 through ISO 1600, depending on lighting and action at the time
  • Aperture variable
  • Shutter variable

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Posted in 2020, Bird Photography, Birds, Blog, Nature Photography
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